The Twelfth Workshop on the Economics of Information Security (WEIS 2013)

Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.

June 11-12, 2013

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

The Workshop on the Economics of Information Security (WEIS) is the leading forum for interdisciplinary scholarship on information security, combining expertise from the fields of economics, social science, business, public policy, law, and computer science. Prior workshops have explored the role of incentives between attackers and defenders, identified market failures in Internet security, quantified risks of personal data disclosure, and assessed investments in cyber-defense. This year's workshop will build on past efforts using empirical and analytic tools to not only understand threats, but to strengthen security and privacy through novel evaluations of available solutions.

We have assembled an exciting program of 20 peer-reviewed papers from leading researchers. Sessions include:

The program also includes a panel on government initiatives to spur investment, a panel on private sector incentives, and a keynote address on the Forensic Economics by Dartmouth Professor Eric Zitzewitz.

We encourage scholars, policy makers, and industry experts interested in both market and policy solutions for cybersecurity to attend this workshop. It will be of interest to economists, computer scientists, business school researchers, legal scholars, and government administrators.

Registration is open online: here.

WEIS 2013 will be hosted by the Center for Business and Public Policy at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business.

WEIS 2013 Program Committee

Alessandro Acquisti, Carnegie Mellon University

Ross Anderson, University of Cambridge

Rainer Böhme, University of Munster

Laura Brandimarte, Carnegie Mellon University

L. Jean Camp, Indiana University

Huseyin Cavusoglu, University of Texas at Dallas

Nicolas Christin, Carnegie Mellon University

Benjamin Edelman, Harvard Business School

Michel van Eeten, Delft University of Technology

Allan Friedman, The Brookings Institution (Chair)

Vaibhav Garg, Indiana University

Lawrence A. Gordon, University of Maryland

Jens Grossklags, Penn State University

Cormac Herley, Microsoft Research

Martin P. Loeb, University of Maryland

Kanta Matsuura, University of Tokyo

Tyler Moore, Southern Methodist University

Andrew Odlyzko, University of Minnesota

David J. Pym, University of Aberdeen

Brent R. Rowe, RTI International

Richard J. Sullivan, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City

Rahul Telang, Carnegie Mellon University

Russell Thomas, George Mason University

Catherine Tucker, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Liad Wagman, Illinois Institute of Technology

Rich Wash, Michigan State University

Julian Williams, University of Aberdeen